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Risk Factors for Falling Are Different in Older Men Versus Older Women

Different factors were associated with falling in men versus women in a study of 3,112 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Wednesday, December 5, 2018 12:01 am EST
"The results of our study suggest that men and women have different fall risk profiles. If we take these sex differences into consideration in screening and prevention programs for falls, we may potentially enable a better person-centered approach."

Different factors were associated with falling in men versus women in a study of 3,112 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

In the short term, living alone, needing help with activities of daily living, and previous falls were independently associated with injurious falls in women. Low systolic blood pressure, impaired ability to rise from a chair, and previous falls were associated with injurious falls in men.

Long-term risk factors were underweight, cognitive impairment, use of medications associated with an increased risk of falling, and needing help with activities of daily living for women and smoking, heart disease, impaired balance, and a previous fall for men.

”Despite the numerous studies on risk factors for falls in older adults, studies examining sex differences are scarce,“ said lead author Stina Ek, of the Karolinska Institutet, in Sweden. ”The results of our study suggest that men and women have different fall risk profiles. If we take these sex differences into consideration in screening and prevention programs for falls, we may potentially enable a better person-centered approach.“

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jgs.15657 

About Journal

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) is the go-to journal for clinical aging research. We provide a diverse, interprofessional community of healthcare professionals with the latest insights on geriatrics education, clinical practice, and public policy—all supporting the high-quality, person-centered care essential to our well-being as we age. Since the publication of our first edition in 1953, JAGS has remained one of the oldest and most impactful journals dedicated exclusively to gerontology and geriatrics.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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