Skip to main content

Building

A better future

through education, skill development and research

LEARN MORE

Study Provides Insights on the Effects of Cannabidiol on Severe Form of Epilepsy

Results from a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology may help explain why cannabidiol—a chemical component of marijuana with no psychoactive properties—reduces the frequency of seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy. 

Thursday, November 7, 2019 1:12 pm EST
"The effects of cannabidiol on seizure frequency in Lennox-Gastaut patients could be explained entirely through estimated elevations of blood levels of clobazam, which might mean that cannabidiol in itself may not have any, or at best limited, antiepileptic effects"

Results from a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology may help explain why cannabidiol—a chemical component of marijuana with no psychoactive properties—reduces the frequency of seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy. The effect may be explained by a drug-drug interaction between cannabidiol and the anti-seizure medication clobazam.

The form of epilepsy examined in the study is called Lennox–Gastaut syndrome. Investigators conducted clinical trial simulations for the effect of 20 mg/kg/day cannabidiol on seizure frequency in patients with this syndrome.

“The effects of cannabidiol on seizure frequency in Lennox-Gastaut patients could be explained entirely through estimated elevations of blood levels of clobazam, which might mean that cannabidiol in itself may not have any, or at best limited, antiepileptic effects,” said senior author Geert Jan Groeneveld, MD, PhD, of the Centre for Human Drug Research, in The Netherlands.  

Dr. Groeneveld also co-authored an accompanying editorial that highlights some of the shortcomings of past clinical trial analyses on cannabidiol’s effectiveness for reducing seizures.

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bcp.14158

About Journal 

Published on behalf of the British Pharmacological Society, the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology contains papers and reports on all aspects of drug action in humans: review articles, mini review articles, original papers, commentaries, editorials and letters. The Journal enjoys a wide readership, bridging the gap between the medical profession, clinical research and the pharmaceutical industry. It also publishes research on new methods, new drugs and new approaches to treatment. The journal is recognised as one of the leading publications in its field. It is online only, publishes open access research through its OnlineOpen programme and is published monthly.

About Wiley

Wiley drives the world forward with research and education. Through publishing, platforms and services, we help students, researchers, universities, and corporations to achieve their goals in an ever-changing world. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to all of our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

Multimedia Files:

Preview image

Contact:

Penny Smith +44 (0) 1243 770448 (UK)
newsroom@wiley.com

Business Wire NewsHQsm