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Sleep Length May Affect Risk of Falls and Fractures

Compared with women in a recent study who slept seven to eight hours each night, women who slept for ≤5 hours or ≥10 hours had about a 25 percent increased odds of experiencing recurrent falls (falling at least twice in a year). In the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research analysis, poor sleep quality, insomnia, and more sleep disturbances were also associated with an increased odds of recurrent falls.

Wednesday, November 21, 2018 12:01 am EST
"Even though falls are caused by a number of factors, our paper focuses on a novel risk factor: sleep. Results suggest that interventions aimed at improving sleep may reduce the risk of falls."

Compared with women in a recent study who slept seven to eight hours each night, women who slept for ≤5 hours or ≥10 hours had about a 25 percent increased odds of experiencing recurrent falls (falling at least twice in a year). In the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research analysis, poor sleep quality, insomnia, and more sleep disturbances were also associated with an increased odds of recurrent falls. 

Short sleep was associated with an increased risk of all fractures, and upper limb, lower limb, and central body fractures, but not with an increased risk of hip fractures.

The analysis included 157,306 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative, with an average follow-up time of 7.6 years for falls and 12.0 years for fractures. The annualized rate of recurrent fall events was 10.6 percent among women reporting ≤5 hours of sleep per night, 7.0 percent among women sleeping seven to eight hours per night, and 11.8 percent among women sleeping ≥10 hours per night.

“Falls are an important public health problem among older adults and lead to moderate to severe injuries. Most fractures occur because of falls, and recent evidence shows that mortality from falls in the US is increasing,” said lead author Dr. Jane Cauley, of the University of Pittsburgh. “Even though falls are caused by a number of factors, our paper focuses on a novel risk factor: sleep. Results suggest that interventions aimed at improving sleep may reduce the risk of falls.”

Additional Information


Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jbmr.3619  


About Journal

The Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (JBMR) publishes highly competitive original manuscripts, reviews, and special articles in basic and clinical science relevant to bone, muscle and mineral metabolism. Manuscripts are published on the biology and physiology of bone and muscle, relevant systems biology topics (e.g. osteoimmunology), and the pathophysiology and treatment of sarcopenia and disorders of bone and mineral metabolism. JBMR is the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR), published monthly on the Society's behalf by Wiley-Blackwell. With an impact factor of 6.314, JBMR is the top-ranked journal in its field.


About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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