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Autism Spectrum Disorders Linked with Excess Weight Gain in Children

A recent meta-analysis published in Obesity Reviews revealed that children with autism spectrum disorders had a 41.1% higher risk of developing obesity than matched groups of children, and on average, 22 out of 100 children with autism were found to have obesity.

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 12:01 am EDT
"Clinicians as well as parents need to be made aware of this greater risk to prevent our children with autism from being victims of obesity and its devastating complications."

A recent meta-analysis published in Obesity Reviews revealed that children with autism spectrum disorders had a 41.1% higher risk of developing obesity than matched groups of children, and on average, 22 out of 100 children with autism were found to have obesity.

The analysis, which examined results from relevant published studies, also found that children with autism spectrum disorders who were of non‐Caucasian race, older in age, female, and living in the United States had especially higher rates of overweight or obesity. 

“Neurobehavioral abnormalities related to autism, and more importantly, our treatment decisions may contribute to excessive weight gain in children with autism,” said lead author Chanaka Kahathuduwa, MD (MBBS), PhD, of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. “Clinicians as well as parents need to be made aware of this greater risk to prevent our children with autism from being victims of obesity and its devastating complications.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/obr.12933

About Journal 

Obesity Reviews is a monthly journal publishing reviews on all disciplines related to obesity and its comorbidities. This includes basic and behavioral sciences, clinical treatment and outcomes, epidemiology, prevention and public health. The journal should, therefore, appeal to all professionals with an interest in obesity and its comorbidities. Review types may include systematic narrative reviews, quantitative meta-analyses and narrative reviews but all must offer new insights, critical or novel perspectives that will enhance the state of knowledge in the field. Prevalence studies that compare (review) trends across countries or regions or across ethnic groups or relevant subpopulations and provide novel insights and/or conclusions will be considered. The journal also invites short reviews presenting original or challenging theories, hypotheses or alternative interpretations of findings. Case reports presenting important and novel information and Letters to the Editor are also welcome. The journal will contribute to education and inter-professional developments by planning pro and con reviews on current controversies.

About Wiley

Wiley drives the world forward with research and education. Through publishing, platforms and services, we help students, researchers, universities, and corporations to achieve their goals in an ever-changing world. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to all of our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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