Skip to main content

Building

A better future

through education, skill development and research

LEARN MORE

Wind Farms Along Mountain Ridges May Negatively Affect Bats

By attaching miniaturized Global Positioning System tags to cave bats near a mountain ridge in Thailand, researchers have shown that bats repeatedly use mountain slopes to ascend to altitudes of more than 550 m above the ground. 

Wednesday, November 1, 2017 4:23 pm EDT

By attaching miniaturized Global Positioning System tags to cave bats near a mountain ridge in Thailand, researchers have shown that bats repeatedly use mountain slopes to ascend to altitudes of more than 550 m above the ground.

The Mammal Review findings suggest that mountain ridges are key habitat features that help with foraging and navigation for some bats. Therefore, development of wind farms along mountain ridges might be in conflict with the conservation of some open-space foraging bats.

“Mountain ridges seem to be sensitive places for bats because some open-space bats use these sites for foraging and for launching into the nightly skies. The recorded flight paths suggest that some bats may be attracted to wind turbines when these are placed along mountain ridges—a fatal attraction for bats,” said senior author Dr. Christian Voigt, of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, in Germany.

Additional Information

Link to Studyhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mam.12109/full

About Journal

Mammal Review is the official scientific periodical of the Mammal Society, and covers all aspects of mammalian biology and ecology. Hypothesis-driven analytical and systematic reviews of current theoretical and applied research on mammals, meta-analyses, practical assessments of techniques for studying mammals and large-scale considerations of the status, conservation and management of mammals are particularly welcome. We publish limited numbers of comments, in which authors respond to papers published in Mammal Review, and short communications, in which new findings or methods from the field of mammalogy are described. We also publish perspectives, in which authors present an original point of view on any aspect of mammalian biology, behaviour, ecology and evolution, or on a management issue in mammalogy.

Multimedia Files:

Preview image

Contact:

Canon Carson (US) 1 201-748-5838
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Follow us on Twitter @WileyNews

Business Wire NewsHQsm