Skip to main content

Building

A better future

through education, skill development and research

LEARN MORE

When Rabbits and Hares Are Introduced to New Areas: Factors to Consider

Throughout history, humans have deliberately translocated rabbits and hares (leporids) around the world, so they now occupy every continent (except Antarctica). A new Mammal Review article examines studies on the 12 leporid species that have been introduced by humans to areas beyond their native ranges, highlighting the animals’ effects on the ecosystem at different levels.

Thursday, July 5, 2018 12:01 am EDT
"Considering all introduced leporid species and their many effects on the ecosystems in crucial at the time of planning conservation strategies."

Throughout history, humans have deliberately translocated rabbits and hares (leporids) around the world, so they now occupy every continent (except Antarctica). A new Mammal Review article examines studies on the 12 leporid species that have been introduced by humans to areas beyond their native ranges, highlighting the animals’ effects on the ecosystem at different levels.
The authors note that leporids can provide food resources to predators, modify nutrient availability and soil structure, compete with native herbivores, consume crops, and have other impacts. Therefore, conservation biologists should carefully consider the contrasting effects of leporids when planning management strategies including these species.
“Although conservation issues and economic costs produced by rabbits’ introductions around the world are well known, there is a lack of systematic information about this regarding their closest relatives. Hares and rabbits share some biological traits which could make them successful invaders and profoundly change the invaded regions. Perhaps one of the most notorious effects (among the many that they produce), is that they constitute a new and abundant food resource to a wide variety of predators, ultimately changing biological communities,” said co-author Dr. Facundo Barbar, of Universidad Nacional del Comahue, in Argentina. “Considering all introduced leporid species and their many effects on the ecosystems in crucial at the time of planning conservation strategies.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/mam.12126

About Journal

Mammal Review is the official scientific periodical of the Mammal Society, and covers all aspects of mammalian biology and ecology. Hypothesis-driven analytical and systematic reviews of current theoretical and applied research on mammals, meta-analyses, practical assessments of techniques for studying mammals and large-scale considerations of the status, conservation and management of mammals are particularly welcome. We publish limited numbers of comments, in which authors respond to papers published in Mammal Review, and short communications, in which new findings or methods from the field of mammalogy are described. We also publish perspectives, in which authors present an original point of view on any aspect of mammalian biology, behaviour, ecology and evolution, or on a management issue in mammalogy

About Wiley 

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

Multimedia Files:

Preview image
Photo credit: Gonzalo Ignazi
Preview image
Photo credit: Gonzalo Ignazi
Preview image

Contact:

Josh Glickman (US) +1 201-748-6572
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Follow us on Twitter @WileyNews

Business Wire NewsHQsm