Skip to main content

Building

A better future

through education, skill development and research

LEARN MORE

Military Sexual Assault Linked to PTSD and Depression in LGB Veterans

In a Journal of Traumatic Stress study of military veterans, lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) veterans were twice as likely to have experienced sexual assault while in the military compared with non-LGB veterans. In addition, the experience of military sexual assault was directly linked to the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among LGB veterans.

Wednesday, August 8, 2018 12:01 am EDT
"Our study highlights critical information: LGB veterans were more likely to experience sexual assault while serving in the military. Now is the time to further understand not only the experiences of veterans, but to understand current trends within the military to provide real-time prevention, training, and interventions, as needed"

In a Journal of Traumatic Stress study of military veterans, lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) veterans were twice as likely to have experienced sexual assault while in the military compared with non-LGB veterans. In addition, the experience of military sexual assault was directly linked to the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among LGB veterans.

The findings highlight the likelihood that the presence of PTSD and depression in LGB veterans after military service may be due to past sexual assault experiences.

More research is needed to understand the factors that may predict sexual assault in the military, particularly among LGB service members, as well as how to best address the mental health needs of veterans regardless of their identity.

“Our study highlights critical information: LGB veterans were more likely to experience sexual assault while serving in the military. Now is the time to further understand not only the experiences of veterans, but to understand current trends within the military to provide real-time prevention, training, and interventions, as needed,” said lead author Dr. Carrie Lucas.
(The views expressed in this material are those of the author, and do not reflect the official policy and position of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Air Force.)

Additional Information:

Link to study:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jts.22308

About Journal:

Journal of Traumatic Stress (JTS) is published for the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

Journal of Traumatic Stress , the official publication for the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, is an interdisciplinary forum for the publication of peer-reviewed original papers on biopsychosocial aspects of trauma. Papers focus on theoretical formulations, research, treatment, prevention education/training, and legal and policy concerns. Journal of Traumatic Stress serves as a primary reference for professionals who study and treat people exposed to highly stressful and traumatic events (directly or through their occupational roles), such as war, disaster, accident, violence or abuse (criminal or familial), hostage-taking, or life-threatening illness. The journal publishes original articles, brief reports, review papers, commentaries, and, from time to time, special issues devoted to a single topic.

About Wiley 

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

Multimedia Files:

Preview image

Contact:

Penny Smith (UK) +44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Follow us on Twitter @WileyNews

Business Wire NewsHQsm