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Extending Sleep May Lower Cardiometabolic Risk

Increasing sleep duration may help reduce cardiometabolic risk—or the risk of heart disease and metabolic disorders— in individuals who do not get enough sleep, according to a Journal of Sleep Research analysis of all published studies on the topic.

Wednesday, June 5, 2019 12:01 am EDT
"Although we have focused on studies with sleep extension interventions in this review, it is now apparent that poor sleep quality may be an equally important risk factor for cardiometabolic disease"

Increasing sleep duration may help reduce cardiometabolic risk—or the risk of heart disease and metabolic disorders— in individuals who do not get enough sleep, according to an analysis of all published studies on the topic.

The Journal of Sleep Research analysis, which was led by researchers at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, included seven studies that aimed to increase sleep duration in adults by any sleep extension intervention. These studies had a combined number of 138 participants who were either healthy, healthy short-sleeping, overweight short-sleeping, or pre- or hypertensive short-sleeping individuals. The durations of the sleep extension interventions ranged from three days to six weeks and all successfully increased total sleep time by between 21 and 177 minutes.

Sleep extension was associated with improved measures of insulin sensitivity and reductions in overall appetite, desire for sweet and salty foods, intake of daily free sugar, and percentage of daily caloric intake from protein.

“Given the overwhelming evidence that sleeping less than seven hours is associated with an increased cardiometabolic risk, it is surprising that so few studies have explored whether extending sleep duration can lower cardiometabolic risk,” said lead author Rob Henst, a PhD candidate. He noted that this review highlights the need for such studies and provides direction for future study designs.

“Although we have focused on studies with sleep extension interventions in this review, it is now apparent that poor sleep quality may be an equally important risk factor for cardiometabolic disease,” added senior author Dr. Dale Rae. “Thus future studies testing interventions aimed at improving sleep quality are also required.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jsr.12865

About Journal 

The Journal of Sleep Research is dedicated to basic and clinical sleep research. The Journal publishes original research papers and invited reviews in all areas of sleep research (including biological rhythms). The Journal aims to promote the exchange of ideas between basic and clinical sleep researchers coming from a wide range of backgrounds and disciplines. The Journal will achieve this by publishing papers which use multidisciplinary and novel approaches to answer important questions about sleep, as well as its disorders and the treatment thereof.

About Wiley

Wiley drives the world forward with research and education. Our scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals and our digital learning, certification, and student-lifecycle services and solutions help students, researchers, universities, and corporations to achieve their goals in an ever-changing world. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to all of our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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Penny Smith +44 (0) 1243 770448 (UK)
newsroom@wiley.com

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