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Certain Characteristics Linked with Different Trajectories of Depression Before and After Giving Birth

Depression during pregnancy and following childbirth (perinatal depression) is a common and potentially severe condition. In a Journal of Neuroscience Research study, researchers examined subgroups of women followed from pregnancy to six months postpartum, for example comparing those with depression only after childbirth with those experiencing depression during pregnancy.

Wednesday, February 6, 2019 12:01 am EST
"The results also suggest a need for individualized advice and possibly different treatment approaches for different patient subgroups; however, we do believe further studies are needed to deepen our understanding of these issues."

Depression during pregnancy and following childbirth (perinatal depression) is a common and potentially severe condition. In a Journal of Neuroscience Research study, researchers examined subgroups of women followed from pregnancy to six months postpartum, for example comparing those with depression only after childbirth with those experiencing depression during pregnancy.

Several characteristics were associated with depression before and after giving birth, including smoking prior to pregnancy, having experienced intimate partner violence, and suffering from migraines or premenstrual syndrome. Various other characteristics were unique to depressive symptoms at different time points before and after giving birth.

The findings suggest that different perinatal depression trajectories have different characteristics, which could be used to create individualized treatment options.

“We are glad that our study of this complex phenomenon contributes further information on the possible pathways and pathogenesis of depressive symptoms in the perinatal period,” said lead author Dr. Anna Wikman, of Uppsala University, in Sweden. “The results also suggest a need for individualized advice and possibly different treatment approaches for different patient subgroups; however, we do believe further studies are needed to deepen our understanding of these issues.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jnr.24390  

About Journal 

The Journal of Neuroscience Research (JNR) publishes novel research results that will advance our understanding of the development, function and pathophysiology of the nervous system, using molecular, cellular, systems, and translational approaches. JNR covers both basic research and clinical aspects of neurology, neuropathology, psychiatry or psychology.

The journal focuses on uncovering the intricacies of brain structure and function. Research published in JNR covers all species from invertebrates to humans, and the reports inform the readers about the function and organization of the nervous system, with emphasis on how disease modifies the function and organization.

JNR publishes primary research articles, neurotechniques, critical reviews, commentaries, or letters to the editor, which offer expert insight into cutting edge research in the neuroscience community. A complete list of contribution types is given below. For primary research contributions, only full-length investigative reports are desired; the journal does not accept short communications.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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