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Tai Chi Improves Brain Metabolism and Muscle Energetics in Older Adults

A new Journal of Neuroimaging study provides insights into the biochemical mechanisms by which Tai Chi— a mind-body exercise—may provide both physical and psychological benefits.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018 6:34 am EDT
"The benefits of Tai Chi have been well known anecdotally; however recent research such as our study can quantify these improvements using objective measures"

A new Journal of Neuroimaging study provides insights into the biochemical mechanisms by which Tai Chi— a mind-body exercise—may provide both physical and psychological benefits.

Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a non-invasive method of measuring brain and muscle chemistry using MRI machines, tests conducted in 6 older adults enrolled in a 12-week Tai Chi program revealed significant increases in a marker of neuronal health in the brain and significantly improved recovery rates of a metabolite involved in energy production in leg muscles.  

“The benefits of Tai Chi have been well known anecdotally; however recent research such as our study can quantify these improvements using objective measures,” said senior author Dr. Alexander Lin, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.


Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jon.12515

About Journal

The Journal of Neuroimaging offers full coverage of all the relevant clinical neurological aspects of MRI, SPECT, Neurosonology, CT, PET, Transcranial Doppler, Carotid Ultrasound, and other neuroimaging modalities. This journal gives you the kind of practical information you can put to immediate use but cannot find elsewhere. Save valuable time by reading this one publication; you’ll learn the developments, research, equipment and reports that have the most meaning for you.Expert authors advise readers on the best techniques for maximum results and minimal risk. Carefully reproduced images illustrate the articles with clarity and fidelity. The articles and illustrations emphasize selecting the appropriate modality and using neuroimaging techniques to improve patient care.The Journal of Neuroimaging addresses the full spectrum of human nervous system disease including stroke, neoplasia, degenerative and demyelinating disease, epilepsy, infectious disease, toxic-metabolic disease, psychoses, dementias, heredo-familial disease and trauma. Each issue offers original clinical articles, case reports, articles on advances in experimental research, technology updates, and neuroimaging CPCs. 

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Contact:

Penny Smith
+44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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