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Web-Based Support System May Help People Lose Weight and Keep It Off

In a randomized long-term lifestyle change trial, an Internet-based health behavior change support system (HBCSS) was effective in improving weight loss and reduction in waist circumference for up to 2 years. The findings are published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Thursday, July 5, 2018 12:01 am EDT
"Modifiable tools based on scientific evidence are needed for personalized treatment of obesity. HBCSS combined with cognitive behavioural group therapy or as a stand-alone treatment provides us with such a modifiable method for personalized medicine"

In a randomized long-term lifestyle change trial, an Internet-based health behavior change support system (HBCSS) was effective in improving weight loss and reduction in waist circumference for up to 2 years. The findings are published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

The 532-participant trial included 6 arms: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based group counselling, self-help guidance-based group counselling, and control, each with and without HCBSS. Interventions using the HBCSS had significantly higher success rates at losing weight and maintaining weight loss, regardless of the type of group counselling, compared with counselling alone. In addition, the success rate was also high in participants in the control group who received HBCSS.

CBT-based counselling with HBCSS produced the largest weight reduction without any significant weight gain during follow-up. The average weight change in this group was 4.1% at 12 months and 3.4% at 24 months. HBCSS even without any group counselling reduced the average weight by 1.6% at 24 months.

“Modifiable tools based on scientific evidence are needed for personalized treatment of obesity. HBCSS combined with cognitive behavioural group therapy or as a stand-alone treatment provides us with such a modifiable method for personalized medicine,” said co–lead author Dr. Tuire Salonurmi, of University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, in Finland.

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joim.12802

About Journal

Journal of Internal Medicine (JIM), with its International Advisory Board, has developed into a highly successful journal since it was launched in its revised form in 1989. With an Impact Factor of 7.980, Journal of Internal Medicine now ranks 10th among the 154 journals in the General & Internal Medicine category.

  • Established in 1863.
  • Features original clinical articles within the broad field of general and internal medicine and its sub-specialties.
  • A fully international journal publishing articles in English from all over the world.
  • Peer-reviewed and published in both print and online versions.

JIM also supports and organizes scientific meetings in the form of symposia within the scope of the journal.

About Wiley 

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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