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Participating in Sports During Childhood May Have Long-Term Benefits for Bone Health

Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age, according to a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 12:01 am EDT
"Targeted messages to young males and females that discourage dropping out of sport and encourage joining sport—even in adolescence—are important for the benefits of skeletal health"

Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age, according to a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study.

In the study that followed 984 children into young adulthood, males who were ‘consistent sport participators’ from ages 5-17 years had significantly greater whole body and leg bone mineral content at age 20 years than those who dropped out of sport, whereas males who ‘joined sports’ had significantly greater leg bone mineral content than those who dropped out of sport. Females who were ‘consistent sport participators’ had significantly greater leg bone mineral content at 20 years of age than those who dropped out.

Because attainment of optimal peak bone mass in young adulthood is protective against osteoporosis later in life, participation in organized sport may have long-term skeletal benefits.

“Targeted messages to young males and females that discourage dropping out of sport and encourage joining sport—even in adolescence—are important for the benefits of skeletal health,” said lead author Dr. Joanne McVeigh, of Curtin University, in Australia.

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbmr.3583

About Journal

The Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (JBMR) publishes highly competitive original manuscripts, reviews, and special articles in basic and clinical science relevant to bone, muscle and mineral metabolism. Manuscripts are published on the biology and physiology of bone and muscle, relevant systems biology topics (e.g. osteoimmunology), and the pathophysiology and treatment of sarcopenia and disorders of bone and mineral metabolism. JBMR is the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR), published monthly on the Society's behalf by Wiley-Blackwell. With an impact factor of 6.314, JBMR is the top-ranked journal in its field.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in education and scholarly research. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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