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Study Examines Urinary Tract Infections and Antibiotic Use in Nursing Homes

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of nursing homes in the tropics, one in five residents had received antibiotics within the last 30 days. Also, urinary tract infection (UTI) accounted for 40 percent of all infections treated with antibiotics within the last 30 days.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018 12:01 am EST
"In the era of growing antimicrobial resistance, it is vital to ensure that antibiotics are only used when clearly indicated"

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of nursing homes in the tropics, one in five residents had received antibiotics within the last 30 days. Also, urinary tract infection (UTI) accounted for 40 percent of all infections treated with antibiotics within the last 30 days.

New or worsening confusion was one of the strongest factors associated with antibiotic treatment for suspected UTI.

“In the era of growing antimicrobial resistance, it is vital to ensure that antibiotics are only used when clearly indicated,” said lead author Dr. Sean Mayne, of James Cook University, in Cairns, Australia. “Suspected UTI is the most common reason for antibiotic prescription in nursing home residents, often a presumptive diagnosis based on non-specific symptoms, which makes it a key target for reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.15179/full

About Journal

Included in more than 9,000 library collections around the world, JAGS is the go-to journal for clinical aging research. We provide a diverse, interprofessional community of healthcare professionals with the latest insights on geriatrics education, clinical practice, and public policy—all supporting the high-quality, person-centered care essential to our well-being as we age.

Our rigorous peer-review process ensures that we bring healthcare professionals, older adults, and caregivers research with the potential to impact public policy and geriatrics care today—and tomorrow. Since the publication of our first edition in 1953, JAGS has remained one of the oldest and most impactful journals dedicated exclusively to gerontology and geriatrics.

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Contact:

Penny Smith
+44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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