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Study Examines Indoor Exposure to Air Pollution

In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents’ daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution. Associations between indoor air pollutants and building ventilation or cooking were also observed.

Thursday, February 21, 2019 12:01 am EST
"Part of the emissions adding this type of hazardous exposure among residents, also including susceptible population groups, originates directly from the personal use of a wood-fired room heater or sauna stove. Insufficient natural ventilation in older houses further elevates the indoor levels of the hazardous particles."

In an Indoor Air study conducted in a suburb of the city of Kuopio, Finland, relatively short-lasting wood and candle burning of a few hours increased residents’ daily exposure to potentially hazardous particulate air pollution. Associations between indoor air pollutants and building ventilation or cooking were also observed.

The study found that the local outdoor levels of certain pollutants and ozone were the most important determinants of indoor levels of the same air pollutants.

“Ample burning of wood in small-scale room heaters and sauna stoves is likely to increase chronic personal exposures in the neighborhood to particulate matter that contains substantial amounts of soot and hazardous organic compounds like polycyclic organic hydrocarbons. This exposure does not take place only while staying outdoors but also indoors at home due to effective passage of the small particles through the building shield,” the authors wrote. “Part of the emissions adding this type of hazardous exposure among residents, also including susceptible population groups, originates directly from the personal use of a wood-fired room heater or sauna stove. Insufficient natural ventilation in older houses further elevates the indoor levels of the hazardous particles.” 

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ina.12538 

About Journal 

The quality of the environment within buildings is a topic of major importance for public health.

Indoor Air provides a location for reporting original research results in the broad area defined by the indoor environment of non-industrial buildings. An international journal with multidisciplinary content, Indoor Air publishes papers reflecting the broad categories of interest in this field:

  • health effects
  • thermal comfort
  • monitoring and modelling
  • source characterization
  • ventilation and other environmental control techniques.

The research results present the basic information to allow designers, building owners, and operators to provide a healthy and comfortable environment for building occupants, as well as giving medical practitioners information on how to deal with illnesses related to the indoor environment.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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