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Study Identifies Shortcomings when Young Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care

Youth-onset type 2 diabetes is increasing globally as a result of pediatric obesity.

Monday, March 12, 2018 6:16 am EDT
"Our study underscores the need for focus on the healthcare transition period in young adults with youth-onset type 2 diabetes. These young adults have unique needs which are not currently being addressed, resulting in devastating consequences"

Youth-onset type 2 diabetes is increasing globally as a result of pediatric obesity. A new study in Diabetic Medicine shows that young adults with type 2 diabetes have substantially worse blood sugar control and loss to follow-up during healthcare transition from pediatric to adult health systems. This is the first study of healthcare transition effects in youth-onset type 2 diabetes.

 

The research, which examined information from a US population-based study, has important implications for clinicians and healthcare systems, requiring increased attention to tailored approaches and policies for young individuals with type 2 diabetes in transition.

 

“Our study underscores the need for focus on the healthcare transition period in young adults with youth-onset type 2 diabetes. These young adults have unique needs which are not currently being addressed, resulting in devastating consequences,” said lead author Dr. Shivani Agarwal, of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “As more youth with type 2 diabetes age and enter into adult medical care, both pediatric and adult health systems need to be ready to accommodate these patients' particular needs.”



Additional Information


Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dme.13589/full


About Journal


Diabetic Medicine, the official journal of Diabetes UK, is published monthly simultaneously, in print and online editions.

The journal publishes a range of key information on all clinical aspects of diabetes mellitus, ranging from human genetic studies through clinical physiology and trials to diabetes epidemiology. We do not publish original animal or cell culture studies unless they are part of a study of clinical diabetes involving humans. Categories of publication include research articles, reviews, case reports, editorials, commentaries, and correspondence. All material is peer-reviewed.

We aim to disseminate knowledge about diabetes research with the goal of improving the management of people with diabetes. The journal therefore seeks to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas between clinicians and researchers worldwide. Topics covered are of importance to all healthcare professionals working with people with diabetes, whether in primary care or specialist services.


Surplus generated from the sale of Diabetic Medicine is used by Diabetes UK to know diabetes better and fight diabetes more effectively on behalf of all people affected by and at risk of diabetes as well as their families and carers.”

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Contact:

Penny Smith
+44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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