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Study Reveals Bias in Children Even Before They Reach Kindergarten

In a Developmental Science study of preschool-aged children, implicit and explicit evaluations of Black boys were less positive than evaluations of Black girls, White boys, or White girls.

Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:01 am EST
"This means that efforts to counter such bias must begin very early in children's development."

In a Developmental Science study of preschool-aged children, implicit and explicit evaluations of Black boys were less positive than evaluations of Black girls, White boys, or White girls.

This “gendered racial bias” was exhibited by both White and non-White children and was not correlated with their exposure to diversity. It also mirrors social bias observed in adults.

The study, which reveals the earliest evidence of bias at the intersection of race and gender, underscores the importance of addressing bias in the first years of life.

 “Our results suggest that children are attuned to nuanced patterns of social bias at a surprisingly young age,” said lead author Danielle Perszyk, of Northwestern University. “This means that efforts to counter such bias must begin very early in children's development.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/desc.12788  

About Journal 

Developmental Science aims to represent the very best of contemporary scientific developmental psychology and developmental cognitive neuroscience, both in the presentation of theory and in reporting new data. Developmental Science includes: comparative and biological perspectives, connectionist and computational perspectives, and developmental disorders. Developmental Sciencepublishes work that bridges levels of explanation, such as from brain development to cognitive or social change, or work that specifically attempts to elucidate mechanisms of developmental change at one level. We do not consider submissions on aging, although studies on the effects of early experience on later development (especially those from a biological perspective) are welcome. Manuscripts judged to fall outside this remit may be rejected without full refereeing.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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