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People with False-Positive Cancer Screening Results May Be More Likely to Receive Future Screening

An analysis of electronic medical records indicates that patients who previously had a false-positive breast or prostate cancer screening test are more likely to obtain future recommended cancer screenings.

Monday, April 23, 2018 12:01 am EDT
"We don’t know why the observed pattern occurred"

An analysis of electronic medical records indicates that patients who previously had a false-positive breast or prostate cancer screening test are more likely to obtain future recommended cancer screenings. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that false-positives may be reminders to screen for cancer. Additional studies are needed to explore whether false-positives have a detrimental effect on quality of life or increase anxiety about cancer.

 

False-positive cancer screening test results—when results that are suggestive of cancer ultimately turn out to be wrong—are common. Over 10 years, about 50 to 60 in 100 women who get annual mammograms, 23 in 100 people who get regular stool tests, and 10 to 12 in 100 men who get regular prostate cancer testing will have false-positive results. Such results may affect individuals’ willingness to continue screening for cancer in the future, causing them to be either more diligent or more reluctant about getting screened.

 

To investigate, Glen Taksler, PhD, of the Cleveland Clinic, and his colleagues obtained 10 years of electronic medical records data to analyze the association between prior receipt of a false-positive cancer screening test result and future participation in routine cancer screenings. The records pertained to 92,405 individuals aged 50 to 75 years.

 

Women with a false-positive mammogram were at least 43% more likely to obtain future breast cancer screenings, and the same women were at least 25% more likely to obtain future colorectal cancer screenings. Men with a false-positive prostate cancer screening were at least 22% more likely to obtain future colorectal cancer screenings. Results were stronger for individuals with a greater number of false-positive results. Women with previous false-positive fecal occult blood testing (a type of colorectal cancer screening) were less likely to be up-to-date with breast cancer screening, however.


“We don’t know why the observed pattern occurred,” said Dr. Taksler. “False-positives are a limitation of the technology that we use to check for cancer. Hopefully, over time, the technology will improve so that patients don’t have to deal with as many false-positives.” He noted that other researchers have reported results that conflict with this study’s findings, indicating the need for more research.


Full Citations: “Implications of False-Positives for Future Cancer Screenings.” Glen B. Taksler, Nancy L. Keating, and Michael B. Rothberg. CANCER; Published Online: April 23, 2018 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31271).


URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/cncr.31271


Editorial: “Where There Is Smoke, There Is Not Always Fire.” David C. Johnson and  Joann G. Elmore,. CANCER; Published Online: April 23, 2018 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31267).


URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/cncr.31267


Author Contact: Katrina Healy, Corporate Communications Manager at the Cleveland Clinic, at healyk@ccf.org or +1 216-444-4255.


About the Journal


CANCER is a peer-reviewed publication of the American Cancer Society integrating scientific information from worldwide sources for all oncologic specialties. The objective of CANCER is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the exchange of information among oncologic disciplines concerned with the etiology, course, and treatment of human cancer. CANCER is published on behalf of the American Cancer Society by Wiley and can be accessed online at http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/cancer. Follow us on Twitter @JournalCancer.


About Wiley

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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