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The Revolt of the Rust Belt May Explain Trump’s Election

A new British Journal of Sociology article explains that Donald Trump’s victory was less about the candidate himself and more about a rejection of the Democratic Party by white and black working-class voters across the Rust Belt.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 12:01 am EST
"We usually use demographic categories to understand voting behavior, but it is really the specific character of the region and the institutions that connected it to national politics that explains unusual voting behavior in 2016."

A new British Journal of Sociology article explains that Donald Trump’s victory was less about the candidate himself and more about a rejection of the Democratic Party by white and black working-class voters across the Rust Belt.

The article draws attention to a key question: why did this revolt happen in the upper Midwest and why did it happen in 2016? “It is the death of institutions like labor unions and civic associations that connected these voters to the Democratic Party that is necessary to explain their availability for mobilization by the Trump campaign in 2016,” said author Dr. Michael McQuarrie of the London School of Economics. “We usually use demographic categories to understand voting behavior, but it is really the specific character of the region and the institutions that connected it to national politics that explains unusual voting behavior in 2016.”

The article is part of a special issue of the British Journal of Sociology that asks how can we understand the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States and what sense sociologists in particular can make of the political events that are now shaping political and social life in the US, the UK, and elsewhere.


Additional Information

Link to Studyhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-4446.12328/full

About Journal

British Journal of Sociology is published on behalf of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is unique in the United Kingdom in its concentration on teaching and research across the full range of the social, political and economic sciences. Founded in 1895 by Beatrice and Sidney Webb, the LSE is one of the largest colleges within the University of London and has an outstanding reputation for academic excellence nationally and internationally.

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Contact:

Penny Smith
Tel: +44 (0)1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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