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Do Personality Traits of Compulsive Users of Social Media Overlap with Those Related to Problem Drinking?

A study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology found certain similarities and differences in personality traits when comparing compulsive use of social media with problematic or risky alcohol use.

Wednesday, December 19, 2018 12:01 am EST
"Future work is needed to further elucidate both the similarities and the differences in risk factors between substance and behavioral addictions. Results would be potentially informative for clinicians involved in the treatment of those exhibiting such disordered behaviors"

A study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology found certain similarities and differences in personality traits when comparing compulsive use of social media with problematic or risky alcohol use.

In the study of 143 young men and women, both disordered social media and risky alcohol use were predicted by narcissism and impulsivity. The former was also predicted by reward sensitivity (behavior that is motivated by the prospect of access to a reward), whereas the latter was also predicted by alexithymia (an inability to identify and describe the emotional feelings of oneself and others).

“Future work is needed to further elucidate both the similarities and the differences in risk factors between substance and behavioral addictions. Results would be potentially informative for clinicians involved in the treatment of those exhibiting such disordered behaviors,” said lead author Dr. Michael Lyvers, of Bond University, in Australia. “For example, based on the present results, targeting impulsiveness and other signs of executive dyscontrol may be as relevant to successful treatment of disordered social media use as for disordered substance use, whereas for clients high in narcissism, targeting the drive for positive social reward might prove particularly useful in treating disordered social media use.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ajpy.12236  

About Journal 

Australian Journal of Psychology is the premier scientific journal of the Australian Psychological Society. It covers the entire spectrum of psychological research and receives articles on all topics within the broad scope of the discipline. The journal publishes high quality peer-reviewed articles with reviewers and associate editors providing detailed assistance to authors to reach publication.

The journal publishes reports of experimental and survey studies, including reports of qualitative investigations, on pure and applied topics in the field of psychology. Articles on clinical psychology or on the professional concerns of applied psychology should be submitted to our sister journals, Australian Psychologist or Clinical Psychologist. The journal publishes occasional reviews of specific topics, theoretical pieces and commentaries on methodological issues. There are also solicited book reviews and comments

Annual special issues devoted to a single topic, and guest edited by a specialist editor, are published. The journal regards itself as international in vision and will accept submissions from psychologists in all countries.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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