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Lung Transplant Patients Face Elevated Lung Cancer Risk

In an American Journal of Transplantation study, lung cancer risk was increased after lung transplantation, especially in the native (non-transplanted) lung of single lung transplant recipients.

Wednesday, December 19, 2018 12:01 am EST
"These findings have important implications in understanding long-term risks among lung transplant recipients."

In an American Journal of Transplantation study, lung cancer risk was increased after lung transplantation, especially in the native (non-transplanted) lung of single lung transplant recipients.

This was a large registry-linkage study that utilized matched transplant and cancer registry data from 17 US states/regions, including approximately 50 percent of US transplant recipients from 1987–2012. Researchers found that patients with a single lung transplant had a 13-fold increased risk of lung cancer in the native lung compared with similar persons without a lung transplant in the general population.

Risk factors for the development of lung cancer in the native lung included those typically associated with lung cancer (older age, prior smoking, and pulmonary fibrosis), as well as longer time since transplantation. Compared with cases in the general population, lung cancers in transplant recipients were more frequently of a localized stage and were treated surgically; however, recipients had higher all-cause and cancer-specific mortality.

“Lung cancer is the most common cancer (except for skin cancers) to arise after lung transplant, and this study is one of the first to quantify that risk, examine risk factors, and explore survival in the lung transplant population using a large national cohort,” said lead author Dr. Matthew Triplette, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington, in Seattle. “These findings have important implications in understanding long-term risks among lung transplant recipients.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ajt.15181  

About Journal 

With its high quality content, an average time to decision of 19 days, and an Impact Factor of 6.165 (ranked no. 2 in Transplantation, no. 5 in Surgery), the American Journal of Transplantation is the journal you can’t be without.

The American Journal of Transplantation serves as a forum for debate and reassessment, an agent of change, and a major platform for promoting understanding, improving results, and advancing science in this dynamic field. Published monthly, the American Journal of Transplantation provides an essential resource for researchers and clinicians around the world.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in research and education. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, and our digital learning, assessment, certification and student-lifecycle services and solutions help universities, academic societies, businesses, governments and individuals to achieve their academic and professional goals. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

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