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  • June 07, 2011
    Patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee arthroplasty at hospitals with lower surgical volume had a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and mortality following the procedure. The complications following joint replacement surgery at low-volume sites may be reduced by modifying systems and procedures used before and after surgery according to the findings published today in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).The...
  • June 01, 2011
    Patients who undergo surgery are more likely to suffer surgical site infections (SSIs) if the operating theatre is noisy, according to research published in the July issue of the British Journal of Surgery.Swiss researchers studied 35 patients who underwent planned, major abdominal surgery, exploring demographic parameters, the duration of the operation and sound levels in the theatre. Six of the patients (17 per cent) developed SSIs and the only variable was the noise level in the operating...
  • May 31, 2011
    HOBOKEN, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Selling happiness seems to have hit a chord with American consumers, with Coca-Cola urging customers to “Open Happiness” and Zappos.com promising to continue “Delivering Happiness.” Recent data from The Gallup Healthways Well-Being Index workplace survey reveals that workplace satisfaction in the U.S. has continued to decline over the past three years. This data suggests there may be a correlation between Americans...
  • May 31, 2011
    A new study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine found that the presence of depressive symptoms in men with erectile dysfunction constitutes a risk factor for a major cardiovascular event.Erectile dysfunction and depressive mood are often associated, and both are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. To investigate clinical correlates further, researchers led by Elisa Bandini of the University of Florence studied approximately 2,000 male patients in a clinic for...
  • May 26, 2011
    Caffeine reduces muscle activity in the Fallopian tubes that carry eggs from a woman’s ovaries to her womb. “Our experiments were conducted in mice, but this finding goes a long way towards explaining why drinking caffeinated drinks can reduce a woman’s chance of becoming pregnant,” says Professor Sean Ward from the University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, USA. Ward’s study is published today in the British Journal of Pharmacology.Human eggs are microscopically small, but need to travel...
  • May 26, 2011
    New research shows that residents of the Stroke Belt—a southern portion of the U.S. with significantly elevated stroke morality rate—also have a greater incidence of cognitive decline than other regions of the country. Researchers believe shared risk factors among members of this population are to blame. Results of this study, funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), are published in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association....
  • May 24, 2011
    Too many admissions at a hospital at one time can put patients at risk. A new study published today in the Journal of Hospital Medicine suggests that “smoothing” occupancy over the course of a week could help hospitals reduce crowding and protect patients from crowded conditions. The strategy involves controlling the entry of patients, when possible, to achieve more even levels of occupancy instead of the peaks and troughs that are commonly encountered.Researchers gathered inpatient...
  • May 23, 2011
    A new analysis has found that allowing full access to personal medical records increases satisfaction without increasing anxiety in newly diagnosed cancer patients. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that providing accurate information to patients through medical records can be a beneficial complement to verbal communication with their physicians.Most cancer patients say they are eager to receive comprehensive...
  • May 23, 2011
    A new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation reveals that HIV-infected deceased donors represent a potentially novel source of organs for HIV-infected transplant candidates that could decrease waitlist deaths and even shorten the national waitlist.For patients with HIV, there is an increased chance of dying while awaiting transplantation, as the HIV itself causes the risk of dying on the waiting list to be higher. The option of deceased donors who were also infected with...
  • May 19, 2011
    New research shows that African Americans with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) had a higher antibody response to influenza vaccination than European American patients. Treatment with prednisone, a history of hemolytic anemia, and increased disease flares were also linked to low antibody response in SLE patients who received the flu vaccine according to the study now available in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a peer-reviewed journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American...