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  • September 20, 2017
    In a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in civilian women were strongly associated with increased risk of developing lupus, an autoimmune disease.In the study of 54,763 women, investigators found a nearly three-fold elevated risk of lupus among women with probable PTSD and more than two-fold higher risk of lupus among women who had experienced any traumatic event compared with women not exposed to trauma.The findings...
  • September 20, 2017
    New research indicates that fish may adapt their behaviour to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology.When investigators studied Atlantic salmon, clear differences in parasite load existed between behaviourally-modified fish and those able to exhibit the normal repertoire of behaviours. Normal salmon displayed greater frequencies of surface behaviours (jumping and rolling) and less swimming activity compared with behaviourally-impaired...
  • September 20, 2017
    A new Biological Reviews study provides a comprehensive assessment of how changes to wetlands affect animals, and the authors use their findings to provide recommendations for managing wetlands to maximise their biodiversity.For the study, researchers characterised how animals respond to four key drivers of wetland alteration: agriculture, mining, restoration, and urbanisation. Population and community-based measures within altered wetlands were largely comparable...
  • September 20, 2017
    How might the Brexit process affect the status of the English language within the European Union? Without Britain, will English even cease to be a language of the Union? A new article in World Englishes explores these questions.Dr. Marko Mondiano, author of the article, notes that one possibility is that the exit of Britain may give rise to a distinct variety of ‘Euro-English’ tailored to the cultures and needs of continental European societies.“The departure of the British from the...
  • September 18, 2017
    Transradial catheterization—when a clinician inserts a long thin tube through the radial artery in the arm—is commonly used to diagnose and treat certain heart conditions. A recent analysis of published studies indicates that the procedure can have a significant detrimental effect on cells in the radial artery, which persists for at least several months post-catheterization. The analysis if published in the Journal of Cardiac Surgery.The findings point to the need for caution when accessing...
  • September 18, 2017
    The PhD degree was established in Berlin 200 years ago and has spread across the world. Today there is a global tendency to follow the programs currently used either in the United States or in Continental Europe. A new study in FEBS Open Bio examines how US and European PhD programs are both similar and different.The analysis, based on what is called the ORPHEUS self-assessment questionnaire, concerned research environment, outcomes, admission criteria,...
  • September 18, 2017
    Transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) individuals often encounter discrimination that may compel them to seek mental health services, but some mental health practitioners are inadequately prepared to work with TGNC clients. Researchers have now presented an in-depth examination of the counseling experiences of 13 TGNC individuals to inform mental health practitioners of helpful and effective counseling methods.Of note, findings from this study underscore that the experiences of TGNC...
  • September 14, 2017
    The largest genomic profiling study ever conducted into a type of brain tumor known as glioma in children has identified genetic alterations in 96% of cases. As reported in The Oncologist, this genetic information could help to identify the most effective treatments for specific cases of glioma, hopefully improving the prognosis for what is currently the leading cause of death for children with cancer in the US.“This study further demonstrates that genomic profiling can be readily...
  • September 14, 2017
    Obese women with large bellies may be at risk of developing a different subtype of breast cancer than those with widespread fat accumulation, according to a new study published in The Oncologist. This suggests that the link between breast cancer and obesity may be more complex than previously thought.The study on women from Northern and Eastern China found that women who accumulated fat around their internal organs (visceral), measured by belly fat, were predisposed to develop a different...
  • September 14, 2017
    In a recent study, screening rates for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among baby boomers increased fivefold in the year following implementation of an electronic health record (EHR)–based prompt for primary care physicians. The prompt also led to dramatic increases in follow-up specialized care for infected patients, according to the Hepatology study.To reduce complications and spread of HCV infections, patients must first be diagnosed and then connected with specialized care for their...