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Prior Exposure to Smoking May Affect Infants’ Respiratory Health

In a Pediatric Pulmonology study of children aged 15 months, increasing hair nicotine levels were related to prior parent-reported smoking exposure and were associated with potential increased risks of wheeze and asthma.

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 12:01 am EST

In a Pediatric Pulmonology study of children aged 15 months, increasing hair nicotine levels were related to prior parent-reported smoking exposure and were associated with potential increased risks of wheeze and asthma.

In the study of 376 infants, researchers obtained detailed information from parents about smoking exposure during pregnancy and in the home at 3 and 15 months of age. Data for demographics, wheezing, and asthma were obtained from yearly questionnaires up to age 6 years. 

Hair nicotine increased with numbers of smokers and daily cigarettes smoked at home, and was also strongly associated with smoking in pregnancy, according to lead author Dr. Philip Pattemore, of the University of Otago Christchurch, in New Zealand. Although overall the hair nicotine levels in the participants were relatively low, higher levels of hair nicotine were associated with increased risk of wheeze and, though not significant, of asthma at 15 months of age. At older ages the associations were non-significant.

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ppul.23903/full

About Journal

Pediatric Pulmonology (PPUL) is the foremost global journal studying the respiratory system in disease and in health as it develops from intrauterine life though adolescence to adulthood.  Combining explicit and informative analysis of clinical as well as basic scientific research, PPUL provides a look at the many facets of respiratory system disorders in infants and children, ranging from pathological anatomy, developmental issues, and pathophysiology to infectious disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis, and airborne toxins.  Focused attention is given to the reporting of diagnostic and therapeutic methods for neonates, preschool children, and adolescents, the enduring effects of childhood respiratory diseases, and newly described infectious diseases.

PPUL concentrates on subject matters of crucial interest to specialists preparing for the Pediatric Subspecialty Examinations in the United States and other countries.  With its attentive coverage and extensive clinical data, this journal is a principle source for pediatricians in practice and in training and a must have for all pediatric pulmonologists.

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