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Night Shift Work Linked to an Increased Risk of Obesity

In an analysis of 28 published studies, night shift work was associated with a 29% increased risk of becoming obese or overweight.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017 12:01 am EDT
"Obesity has been evident to be positively associated with several adverse health outcomes, such as breast cancer, cardiovascular diseases."

In an analysis of 28 published studies, night shift work was associated with a 29% increased risk of becoming obese or overweight. The findings, which are published in Obesity Reviews, suggest that modifying working schedules to avoid prolonged exposure to long-term night shift work might help reduce the risk of obesity.

In the analysis, night shift workers had a higher frequency of developing abdominal obesity than other obesity types. Permanent night workers demonstrated a higher risk than rotating shift workers.

“Globally, nearly 0.7 billion workers are engaged in a shift work pattern. Our study revealed that much of the obesity and overweight among shift workers is attributable to such a job nature,” said Dr. Lap Ah Tse, senior author of the study. “Obesity has been evident to be positively associated with several adverse health outcomes, such as breast cancer, cardiovascular diseases.”


Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/obr.12621/full

About Journal

Obesity Reviews is a monthly journal publishing reviews on all disciplines related to obesity and its comorbidities. This includes basic and behavioral sciences, clinical treatment and outcomes, epidemiology, prevention and public health. The journal should, therefore, appeal to all professionals with an interest in obesity and its comorbidities. Review types may include systematic narrative reviews, quantitative meta-analyses and narrative reviews but all must offer new insights, critical or novel perspectives that will enhance the state of knowledge in the field. Prevalence studies that compare (review) trends across countries or regions or across ethnic groups or relevant subpopulations and provide novel insights and/or conclusions will be considered. The journal also invites short reviews presenting original or challenging theories, hypotheses or alternative interpretations of findings. Case reports presenting important and novel information and Letters to the Editor are also welcome. The journal will contribute to education and inter-professional developments by planning pro and con reviews on current controversies.

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