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Novel Technique Helps Diagnose Swimming-Induced Respiratory Condition

Exercise-induced obstruction of the larynx, or voice box, is often a cause of respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in swimmers. A new report reveals a method to accurately diagnose this condition, using a flexible laryngoscope.

Monday, March 13, 2017 12:57 pm EDT
"This is a major step forward to help us accurately diagnose breathing problems in swimmers. EILO is a very common cause of breathing problems during swimming and is so often misdiagnosed and mistreated as asthma"

Exercise-induced obstruction of the larynx, or voice box, is often a cause of respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in swimmers. A new report reveals a method to accurately diagnose this condition, using a flexible laryngoscope.

Confirming a diagnosis of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) requires visualizing movement of the larynx during intense exercise. In this latest report, investigators used waterproof tape to secure a laryngoscope to the nose, along with a modified swim cap and a laryngoscope cable that was suspended above the water and connected to a monitor.

The recorded laryngoscopic video provided stable, high-quality diagnostic images of the larynx during exercise, without disrupting swim strokes or breathing.

“This is a major step forward to help us accurately diagnose breathing problems in swimmers. EILO is a very common cause of breathing problems during swimming and is so often misdiagnosed and mistreated as asthma,” said Dr. James Hull, senior author of The Laryngoscope article.


Additional Information

Link to study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lary.26532/full

About Journal

The Laryngoscope has been the leading source of information on advances in the diagnosis and treatment of head and neck disorders for nearly 120 years. The Laryngoscope is the first choice among otolaryngologists for publication of their important findings and techniques. Each monthly issue of The Laryngoscope features peer-reviewed medical, clinical, and research contributions in general otolaryngology, allergy/rhinology, otology/neurotology, laryngology/bronchoesophagology, head and neck surgery, sleep medicine, pediatric otolaryngology, facial plastics and reconstructive surgery, oncology, and communicative disorders. 

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