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Study Reveals Racial Differences in the Use of Rehabilitation Services

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of 6309 community-dwelling Medicare enrollees (1276 of whom reported receiving rehabilitation services in the previous 12 months), the likelihood of receiving rehabilitation services was 1.4-times greater in whites than in blacks.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 12:01 am EST

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of 6309 community-dwelling Medicare enrollees (1276 of whom reported receiving rehabilitation services in the previous 12 months), the likelihood of receiving rehabilitation services was 1.4-times greater in whites than in blacks.

Of those receiving therapy, whites were more likely to receive home-based and inpatient rehabilitation services (rather than outpatient services), but there were no racial differences in improvement in function.

“In this sample, a higher proportion of blacks had the lowest functional ability while having lower use of rehabilitation services. Our findings suggest that further work is needed to examine possible barriers to accessing rehabilitation for older black Americans, as rehabilitation use may have the potential to improve Medicare-wide differences in functioning by race,” said lead author Dr. Tamra Keeney, of the MGH Institute of Health Professions.

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.15136/full

About Journal

Included in more than 9,000 library collections around the world, JAGS is the go-to journal for clinical aging research. We provide a diverse, interprofessional community of healthcare professionals with the latest insights on geriatrics education, clinical practice, and public policy—all supporting the high-quality, person-centered care essential to our well-being as we age

Our rigorous peer-review process ensures that we bring healthcare professionals, older adults, and caregivers research with the potential to impact public policy and geriatrics care today—and tomorrow. Since the publication of our first edition in 1953, JAGS has remained one of the oldest and most impactful journals dedicated exclusively to gerontology and geriatrics.

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Contact:

Penny Smith
Tel: +44 (0)1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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