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Study Examines Home Health Care in Medicare Beneficiaries

According to an analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Medicare beneficiaries receiving home health services who are dually enrolled in Medicaid, live in a low-income neighborhood, or are Black tend to receive care from lower-quality home health agencies and have higher rates of hospital admissions and visits to the emergency department than other Medicare beneficiaries.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 am EDT
"Additionally, as Medicare rolls out its Home Health Value-Based Purchasing demonstration, it will be important to track outcomes for these vulnerable groups."

According to an analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Medicare beneficiaries receiving home health services who are dually enrolled in Medicaid, live in a low-income neighborhood, or are Black tend to receive care from lower-quality home health agencies and have higher rates of hospital admissions and visits to the emergency department than other Medicare beneficiaries.
 
“Home health care may be an important area on which to focus clinical interventions to reduce disparities, particularly as the population ages and as needs for home care increase," said Dr. Karen Joynt Maddox, lead author of the study. "Additionally, as Medicare rolls out its Home Health Value-Based Purchasing demonstration, it will be important to track outcomes for these vulnerable groups."  

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.15082/full

About Journal

Included in more than 9,000 library collections around the world, JAGS is the go-to journal for clinical aging research. We provide a diverse, interprofessional community of healthcare professionals with the latest insights on geriatrics education, clinical practice, and public policy—all supporting the high-quality, person-centered care essential to our well-being as we age.

Our rigorous peer-review process ensures that we bring healthcare professionals, older adults, and caregivers research with the potential to impact public policy and geriatrics care today—and tomorrow. Since the publication of our first edition in 1953, JAGS has remained one of the oldest and most impactful journals dedicated exclusively to gerontology and geriatrics.

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