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Study Examines Link Between Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

Mood disorders, including depression, are the most common comorbid conditions in individuals with epilepsy, but the cause remains unclear. Results from a new Epilepsia study suggest that there may be a shared genetic susceptibility to these conditions, expressed only in people with focal epilepsy (in which seizures start in one part of the brain).

Wednesday, January 10, 2018 5:46 am EST
"Additional research is needed to identify specific genes that raise risk for both disorders, and may lead to development of promising new treatments."

Mood disorders, including depression, are the most common comorbid conditions in individuals with epilepsy, but the cause remains unclear. Results from a new Epilepsia study suggest that there may be a shared genetic susceptibility to these conditions, expressed only in people with focal epilepsy (in which seizures start in one part of the brain).

In the study, which included 60 unusual families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy, the lifetime prevalence of mood disorders was significantly increased in people with focal epilepsy but not in people with generalized epilepsy. Prevalence of mood disorders was also increased in people with epilepsy who had relatives with focal epilepsy. Among family members who did not have epilepsy, the lifetime prevalence of mood disorders appeared to be higher than in the general population, but this result did not reach statistical significance.

“Taken together, the findings are consistent with the hypothesis of shared genetic susceptibility to epilepsy and mood disorders, but the effect may be restricted to focal epilepsy and may only be expressed in individuals whose epilepsy susceptibility-related genes are ‘penetrant’—that is, in people who have epilepsy,” said senior author Dr. Gary Heiman, of Rutgers University.

While the comorbidity of mood disorders and epilepsy has been known for a long time, mood disorders are under-recognized and under-treated among people with epilepsy, noted coauthor Dr. Ruth Ottman, of Columbia University. “This study points to the importance of screening and treatment,” she said. “Additional research is needed to identify specific genes that raise risk for both disorders, and may lead to development of promising new treatments.”

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/epi.13985/full

About Journal

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology and therapeutic trials.

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Contact:

Penny Smith
+44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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