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Can Older Adults Safely Donate Kidneys?

With increasing organ demand, living kidney donation from older donors has become more common.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018 12:01 am EDT
"What this study demonstrates is that carefully-selected older kidney donors are at no higher risk, short-term or long-term, than their younger counterparts and this finding has the potential to expand the donor pool by making accessible a whole segment of the population that previously was perceived high-risk for donation"

With increasing organ demand, living kidney donation from older donors has become more common. A new Clinical Transplantation study indicates that kidney donation among carefully-selected adults over 60 years of age poses minimal perioperative risks and no added risk of long-term kidney failure.

A combination of an aging population and an overwhelming kidney transplant waitlist will necessarily compel transplant centers into accepting more older donors as a way to expand the donor pool.

“What this study demonstrates is that carefully-selected older kidney donors are at no higher risk, short-term or long-term, than their younger counterparts and this finding has the potential to expand the donor pool by making accessible a whole segment of the population that previously was perceived high-risk for donation,” said lead author Dr. Oscar Serrano, of the University of Minnesota.

Additional Information

Link to Studyhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ctr.13287

About Journal

Clinical Transplantation: The Journal of Clinical and Translational Research aims to serve as a channel of rapid communication for all those involved in the care of patients who require, or have had, organ or tissue transplants, including: kidney, intestine, liver, pancreas, isets, heart, heart valves, lung, bone marrow, cornea, skin, bone, and cartilage, viable or stored.

Clinical Transplantation is essential reading for clinicians and researchers in the diverse field of transplantation: surgeons; clinical immunologists; cryobiologists; hematologists; gastroenterologists; hepatologists; pulmonologists; nephrologists; cardiologists; and endocrinologists. It will also be of interest to sociologists, psychologists, research workers, and to all health professionals whose combined efforts will improve the prognosis of transplant recipients.

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Contact:

Penny Smith
+44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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