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Exercise May Benefit Patients with Leg Ulcers

A preliminary British Journal of Dermatology study suggests that ulcers in the legs may heal faster with exercise.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 3:47 pm EST
"Having proven that such a programme is workable for everyone involved, we will now seek funding to test the main study hypothesis in seven regions across England."

A preliminary British Journal of Dermatology study suggests that ulcers in the legs may heal faster with exercise.

In the study of 39 patients with venous leg ulcers who were randomized to compression therapy plus supervised exercise (including aerobic, resistance and flexibility elements) or compression therapy only, ulcer healing time was lower in the exercise group (13 versus 35 weeks).

“Although this is a feasibility study and we can't draw any final conclusions from it, our findings suggest that people with ulcers not only enjoy taking part in a supervised exercise scheme, staying in the programme until the end, but may also draw multiple benefits from it, offering reduction in treatment costs as well,” said chief investigator and lead author Dr. Markos Klonizakis, of Sheffield Hallam University, in the UK. “Having proven that such a programme is workable for everyone involved, we will now seek funding to test the main study hypothesis in seven regions across England.”

Disclaimer

This paper presents independent research funded by the NIHR under its Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) Programme (Grant Reference Number PB-PG-0213-30029). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Additional Information

Photo Credit: Markos Klonizakis

Link to Studyhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjd.16089/abstract

About Journal

The British Journal of Dermatology (BJD) strives to publish the highest quality dermatological research. In so doing, the journal aims to advance understanding, management and treatment of skin disease and improve patient outcomes.

BJD invites submissions under a broad scope of topics relevant to clinical and experimental research and publishes original articles, reviews, concise communications, case reports and items of correspondence. The article categories within the journal are: cutaneous biology; clinical and laboratory investigations; contact dermatitis & allergy; dermatological surgery & lasers; dermatopathology; epidemiology & health services research; paediatric dermatology; photobiology; and therapeutics.

BJD is an official organ of the British Association of Dermatologists but attracts contributions from all countries in which sound research is carried out, and its circulation is equally international. The overriding criteria for publication are scientific merit, originality and interest to a multidisciplinary audience.

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