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Michelangelo’s Medici Chapel May Contain Hidden Symbols of Female Anatomy

Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017 4:38 am EDT
"This study provides a previously unavailable interpretation of one of Michelangelo’s major works, and will certainly interest those who are passionate about the history of anatomy"

Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations. A new analysis suggests that Michelangelo may have concealed symbols associated with female anatomy within his famous work in the Medici Chapel.

For example, the sides of tombs in the chapel depict bull/ram skulls and horns with similarity to the uterus and fallopian tubes, respectively.

Numerous studies have offered interpretations of the link between anatomical figures and hidden symbols in works of art not only by Michelangelo but also by other Renaissance artists.

“This study provides a previously unavailable interpretation of one of Michelangelo’s major works, and will certainly interest those who are passionate about the history of anatomy,” said Dr. Deivis de Campos, lead author of the Clinical Anatomy article. Another recent analysis by Dr. de Campos and his colleagues revealed similar hidden symbols in Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel.


Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ca.22882/full

About Journal

Clinical Anatomy is the Official Journal of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists and the British Association of Clinical Anatomists.

The goal of Clinical Anatomy is to provide a medium for the exchange of current information between anatomists and clinicians. This journal embraces anatomy in all its aspects as applied to medical practice. Furthermore, the journal assists physicians and other health care providers in keeping abreast of new methodologies for patient management and informs educators of new developments in clinical anatomy and teaching techniques.

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Contact:

Penny Smith
+44 (0) 1243 770448
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

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